George Inness (American, 1825–1894) Twilight, ca. 1860, oil on canvas, Williams College Museum of Art, Gift of Cyrus P. Smith, Class of 1918, in memory of his father, B. Herbert Smith, Class of 1885(79.66)_x1200
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Tag Archives: Art of the Month Club

Art of the Month Club: Suzanne Silitch

Allen Lewis (American, 1873-1957), Twilight Toil, 1943, color woodcut on paper. Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Gifford M. Lloyd._x209

When I see Twilight Toil, 1943 by American artist Allen Lewis, I think of all those who have come before me to prepare the soil for planting. This elegant woodcut evokes the cool evening air of April, as a jacket-clad farmer walks behind his plow horse, readying his fields under the sliver of a waning April moon.

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Art of the Month Club: Arthur Wheelock

Portraits by Wybrand Simonsz. de Geest the Elder,

Like many Williams undergraduates, I only learned that a field called “art history” existed after I arrived in Williamstown in the fall of 1961.

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Art of the Month Club: Laurel O’Connor

WeemsA_x500

Sometimes art has a way of nuzzling against your curiosity and tugging you back to look a little longer and a little deeper. For me, Carrie Mae Weems’s “Kitchen Series” is just that kind of ‘sometimes art’.

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Art of the Month Club: Kathryn Calley Galitz

Garry Winogrand, New York City, 1968 _x400

Gift of Elizabeth and Frederick M. Myers, Class of 1943. Copyright Gary Winogrand/The Estate of Gary Winogrand, courtesy of the Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco.

Less than a month after I arrived at Williams as a graduate student in the art history program, I had my first hands-on experience at WCMA, wielding a paint roller in one of the museum’s galleries!

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Art of the Month Club: Peter Low

William Morris Hunt (American, 1824-1879), Niagara Falls, 1878, oil on canvas. Gift of the estate of J. Malcolm Forbes._x600

I love William Morris Hunt’s 1878 Niagara Falls. This is partly because, as a transplanted Canadian, the painting calls me back – across a border of time as well as place…

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Art of the Month Club: Christina Yang

Edward Hopper (American, 1882-1967), Morning in a City, 1944, oil on canvas. Bequest of Lawrence H. Bloedel, Class of 1923, © Williams College Museum of Art. (77.9.7)_x345

What first drew me to Edward Hopper’s Morning in a City was his deployment of the gaze. It is a simple enough scene of a young woman standing in a bedroom as her day begins.

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Art of the Month Club: Barbara Ernst Prey

Winslow Homer, (American, 1836-1910), Children on a Fence, 1874, watercolor over pencil on paper. Museum purchase, with funds provided by the Assyrian Relief Exchange._x600

I have spent so much time with so many objects in the Williams College Museum collection that it is hard to choose just one.

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Art of the Month Club: Katy Ganino Reddick

Flemish, 12th century, Baptismal Font, limestone. Museum purchase, Joseph O. Eaton Fund._x300

Among my favorite pieces at WCMA is the 12th century Flemish baptismal font that quite literally took up space in the medieval art room – requiring visitors to walk about it. Although at first glance the font appears nondescript, faceted edges and angles create shadows with light.

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Art of the Month Club: Amelia Wood

Installation view. Amy Podmore, Measured Rest (rabbit), 2009, mixed media. Collection of the artist. Photo by Arthur Evans._x425

When I started my position as the Coordinator of Education Programs at WCMA in mid-November, I was introduced to the Kidspace: Artistic Curiosity exhibition, where I would be working with Museum Associates to provide K-12 tours throughout the academic year. As I entered the gallery, I was immediately taken aback by a white figure with pointed ears, balanced on a tiny green ladder and holding a violin.

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Art of the Month Club: Stephen Hannock

William Morris Hunt (American, 1824-1879), Niagara Falls, 1878, oil on canvas, (61.7) Gift of the estate of J. Malcolm Forbes.

I had been working on a composition of Niagara Falls for years—since 1996—shortly after I had seen my friend Frank Moore’s treatment of the subject.

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