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WCMA Blog

Public Art at Williams

Double L Excentric Gyratory II, 1981; George Warren Rickey (American, 1907-2002); stainless steel; Museum purchase, Inaugural gift of the Class of 1961 Public Art Fund on the occasion of their 50th Reunion, dedicated in the belief that public art enhances the beauty of the Williams campus, accentuates learning, and stimulates creativity; M.2011.8; Photo by Megan Cross_X345The Williams College Museum of Art (WCMA) is pleased to announce the launch of its Public Art Module. Visitors to WCMA’s website can virtually tour the public art on campus and then download a map and see the works in person. Formally established in 2011 as a fiftieth reunion gift from the Class of ’61, the Williams Public Art Program seeks to incorporate unexpected and informal encounters with art into the daily lives of students. It also hopes to inspire faculty to integrate works of art into their teaching. We believe that placing art in public places, in addition to fostering innovative arts programs within the walls of the Williams College Museum of Art, further underscores Williams’ commitment to human creativity and to the significance of the arts within a liberal arts education. The Public Art Program also contributes to creating a welcoming environment for members of our community and for visitors to Williamstown where beauty and intellectual engagement are accessible to all.

One of the twenty five works on the Public Art Module is the inaugural gift of the Class of 1961 Public Art Fund, the sculpture, Double L Excentric Gyratory II, 1981 by George Warren Rickey (American, 1907-2002). Maxwell Davidson, Class of 1961, President and founder of The Maxwell Davidson Gallery in New York wrote, “This impressive 29-foot-high sculpture was created by George Rickey when he was 74 years of age and is among his largest works. The innovative excentric motion, which he pioneered, is based on his experimentation with conical sections that he developed when he was well into his 60s. Rickey figured out that if the conical sections are placed in such a way that they do not intersect, and the sculpture’s motion is transcribed within those sections, the large “L’s”will never hit each other.” Davidson goes on to say, “This sculpture, standing prominently next to the Class of ’62 Center of Theatre and Dance, is a testament to how much alumni can accomplish working in concert with the college.”

The Public Art Module accessed through the WCMA website enables visitors to engage with the art on the William’s campus and permits all audiences to come into contact with these public works of art.

Above photo: Double L Excentric Gyratory II, 1981; George Warren Rickey (American, 1907-2002); stainless steel; Museum purchase, Inaugural gift of the Class of 1961 Public Art Fund on the occasion of their 50th Reunion, dedicated in the belief that public art enhances the beauty of the Williams campus, accentuates learning, and stimulates creativity; M.2011.8; Photo by Megan Cross

4 Responses to Public Art at Williams

  1. Meli says:

    This is a beautiful piece. I’m glad universities are still in tune with placing great art work pieces around the campus. A lot of people I know don’t get the concept, but being an artist and former art major myself, I see the importance in it. Thanks for posting!

  2. Diane says:

    A unique piece of art . Congrats and a job well done.

  3. Family Guy says:

    That was a great article. Thanks for sharing.

  4. Pingback: Philip Rickey lecture « Glinting Phantom

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