Samuel Joseph Brown (American, 1907-1994); Boy in the White Suit, ca. 1940-41; watercolor on paper. Gift of the artist through the Pennsylvania W.P.A. Art Project. (PA.10) x1200
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Monthly Archives: April 2010

Last Chance!

Don’t miss the exhibition Landscapes of the Mind: Contemporary Artists Contemplate the Brain. . .the last day to see the show is this Sunday, May 2. 

If you’ve (somehow!) missed all of the previous posts about this show, Landscapes of the Mind features the work of four contemporary artists—Susan Aldworth, Andrew Carnie, Jessica Rankin, and Katy Schimert—who blend the worlds of art and science.

Enjoy the warm weather this weekend and come to WCMA!  Open Tuesday through Saturday 10 am to 5 pm,…

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Brainscapes and Anna Atkins’s cyanotypes

In March, the Williams College Museum of Art held a symposium that brought together artists and neuroscientists for a day of talks and discussions as part of Landscapes of the Mind: Contemporary Artists Contemplate the Brain.  It was during that time that one of the artists in the show, Susan Aldworth, visited us from her home in London.  Susan is an incredibly engaging person, a wonderful artist, and lots of fun.

One of the things that has stayed with me most about…

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The Gam: A Social Meeting of Two or More Whale-Ships

On April 8, the museum had a “Gam”! As Melville writes in Chapter 53 of Moby-Dick, the Gam is “A social meeting of two (or more) whale-ships generally on a cruising-ground; when, after exchanging hails, they exchange visits by boat’s crews…”

We invited faculty from Williams-Mystic program (a.k.a. “ship” from Mystic CT) to join faculty from Williams in English, Humanities, and Environmental Studies (“ship” from Williamstown MA) and to discuss different themes in the novel Moby-Dick by Herman Melville and the…

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“I am both in my mind and out of my brain”

 

“You can look INTO my brain but you will never find me.”
SUSAN ALDWORTH, 2006

I have been thinking a lot about the title of the exhibition Landscapes of the Mind. Contemporary neuroscience talks of “mapping the mind” — it aims to chart the neural infrastructure of the human mind. This knowledge is important for our understanding of what it is to be human. But whilst a map of the mind suggests the idea of a landscape if we are talking about…

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Magic Forest – Part 2

Beyond Magic Forest

Our discussions were helpful in aiding Richard Wingate in developing teaching strategies for his students and as well as developing his interest in science and art projects. Since we met, he has served on the selection panel for the Wellcome Trust’s art science grants panel and he has become more interested in teaching pedagogies as we have developed our links. Lots of time in Richard’s office was spent with him making explanatory drawings of the work he was undertaking and specifically…

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Magic Forest

The Symposium for Landscapes of the Mind has just taken place; unfortunately logistics and money meant I couldn’t be there! I hope it went well. Since I couldn’t be there I thought I would jot down some bits about Magic Forest (2002) that might be pertinent.

First thing is maybe to set it, in place and time and send a few images of the protagonists. By a bit of a contorted journey I eventually met Richard Wingate, my science associate at King’s…

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